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tinfoil.

and 3D glasses

west coast romance

Tuesday, December 11, 2018


Ain't no replacing you ...

mit - pierce laboratory

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
MIT Pierce Laboratory Building 1

MIT Pierce Laboratory

MIT Pierce Laboratory classroom

A class lecture about AI research and robotics.

I was invited to visit one of MIT's engineering labs at the Pierce Laboratory. It was my very first time at Cambridge so I was looking forward to seeing the sights and meeting some of the students and faculty there.

MIT is ... very motivated to make new advancements in AI science education. They have a lot of ambitious ideas about focusing their cores in artificial intelligence and machine learning, but given some of the stuff they covered in class I am concerned as to how much they're prioritizing 'pure science' above all else. The amount of value they're giving their engineers to design and implement some of the most complex components of artificial intelligence is going waaay overboard.

When we think about human consciousness, for example, based on what we already know about ourselves and how we choose to interact with each other, do you really think that your identity – your authentic self – is replicable through pure logic? Don't you think human consciousness is more nuanced than that?

I mean, MIT touched up on some AI behavioral concepts that were interesting and they're confident about meeting some of their end goals. But again, choosing not to involve experts in the humanities and the arts – and by that I mean: the language majors, philosophers, creatives, etc! – choosing to leave out experts of other disciplines in AI research is a misguided step that will hurt them in the long run.

I do wish them the best though. Got to meet some really accomplished engineers and the students at MIT are a hell of a lot smarter and passionate about their research compared to me that's for sure, pfft!

Would like to visit again, ja. ♡

reading old journal entries from when i was 14


... and marveling at my take-no-prisoners attitude about boys and their shitty opinions.


r.i.p. old hanzo

Saturday, May 5, 2018


Scatter had me cacklin like pfft —

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home

Thursday, March 8, 2018












a timeline of many days later —

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home (cont'd.)





after several unexpected adventures i am not quite finished yet.

i. Nearing the one-year anniversary of relocating and while it's been fun and all I'm still looking to expand my library. I've given a looot of books away – most of which I've outgrown and have no value to me. But earlier this week I built a new bookshelf and I'm noticing a pattern with my new investments in photography and The Legend of Zelda lore. :x

ii. The subway commute's a lot less mundane when I create new playlists along the way. Certified bops I keep in rotation:

saggy denim - princess nokia
cigarettes - amir obè
hasta luego - j.i.d
wait a minute! - willow smith
holographic lover - st. beauty
x - kendrick, schoolboy q, 2 chainz, saudi
lost in nostalgia - xavier omär
silence - they.
cadillactica - big k.r.i.t.

iii. And as for my garden – oh man. Lol. Well, indoors I'm growing a very healthy aloe vera plant, two orchids that are currently on life support, and some vines that I keep very neat and wrapped around my lamp base. I'm still experimenting with that space but if anything's for sure, I want to make a container with water lilies to go along with my fish bowl. And I really can't wait to get started on that this weekend.

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22°c

Saturday, August 26, 2017




... Memories were made. The rest I'll keep. ♡

15° n

Saturday, August 5, 2017


Good morning. ♡.

columbia university - class of 2019

Thursday, August 3, 2017
Been sitting on this all summer, but after a year-long process I'm happy to announce that I'll be attending Columbia U. for graduate school. My first semester will begin next month and I am a little nervous. But I do hope to come out of my experience at Columbia with a more structured and sophisticated approach to disappointing my parents.



But yo ...

... since I broke the news a couple months ago I've been overwhelmed by the questions coming from people I don't even know asking for my advice. Was there anything that I've done differently to get in? I don't think there's a definitive answer to that question. However, I can say that apart from my recommendation letters my statement of purpose may have been the most important factor in distinguishing my candidacy.

So for those of you who are going through applications for grad school, I'd like to offer you some advice on how to write a solid statement of purpose. ♡.


1. OPEN WITH A STRONG HOOK

Remember that you're going to be reviewed by actual people. They're probably going through the motions with other applicants, so you've got to make a connection with them that's written in human language.

My first paragraph involved a conflict and solution scenario based on a technical oversight that I had at work. I basically said, Hey – this crazy shit happened and this was how I resolved the issue using concepts: A,B, and C. But I took the risk of throwing a joke in there so I can only assume that at least somebody at the decision table must've been shook.


2. ADDRESS YOUR SHORTCOMINGS


My freshman year of college was messy. I was 16 and overwhelmed and I barely went to my Intro to Anthropology class. So I got a D.

I couldn't ignore this problem so I mentioned the difficulties I had balancing my social and academic life at the time. But I kept it brief.

If you think your credentials are going to be an issue, then emphasize on how you've changed. And you can do that by showing real, proven results of your road to success. Reference any notable improvements that you've made since and you should be good.


3. BE SPECIFIC AND CONCISE


When it comes to explaining why you think you'd be a good fit for your program of interest, you can't afford to beat around the bush. Don't be vague. And don't just put a string of adjectives together for the word count. Saying that you'd like to go to Starfleet Academy because it's an 'amazing school' with 'a lot of great opportunities' sounds uninspiring. And lazy.

Which courses offered in the curriculum interest you the most? How do you plan to apply yourself, if accepted? Are there any professors you care to work with? These are some questions you can address in your paper, and you can do so successfully by proving that you actually give a damn.


4. DON'T SOUND ARROGANT

If you only care to describe your list of accomplishments and how you think you're so smart and above it, then why the hell are you applying to grad school?

You ought to convey a willingness to learn. Let the admissions committee know that – yes, ok, you're not a dummy – but you still have room for growth and the program you wish to attend has the tools available for your advancement. Let them know how you intend to contribute to your field of study and that you are capable of completing the workload successfully.


5. WRITE SEVERAL DRAFTS


This should go without saying. Leave no grammatical errors in your statement of purpose. Proofread it, have someone look it over. And never, ever settle on your first draft. Keep editing. Keep writing. Do whatever it takes to make that thing look sharp.


♡. ASK FOR HELP!


Contact an advisor. Speak with someone who's been through it all. Get a feel for what you're getting yourself into. The resources available out there are plenty, so don't shy away from help.


+ Hnnn dassit. Hope that covered enough to be somewhat useful ye. ;]

gg ✌.

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